Monthly Archives: March 2015

Southwest Wildfire Awareness Week

Yesterday began Southwest Wildfire Awareness Week, which runs through April 4. According to New Mexico Fire Information, this year’s theme is “Where We Live, How We Live, Living with Wildfire.” Since it’s always dry here and Smokey Bear was born nearby (in the Capitan Mountains), I feel I should help spread the word about preventing wildfires.

Little Bear wildfire burn scar near Ruidoso, NM

Little Bear Fire burn scar outside Ruidoso, N.M., about one month following fire (July 2012). The fire burned 242 homes.

First, there are plenty of smart ways to prevent fires in the wilderness, and most require little more than common sense:

  • Foremost, follow posted fire restrictions, and use your head. Today, the wind is gusting to 45 mph and the humidity is 2 percent. That’s right – TWO percent. I wouldn’t have a campfire in the nearby forest or burn my trash. It also means putting out all fires, matches and embers with plenty of water, and having a shovel and dirt handy.
  • Around the house, use of string trimmers to cut tall grass can prevent fires from sparks and removing rocks before mowing tall, dry grass helps prevent sparks caused by metal blades hitting the rocks. Chainsaws and dragging items such as tow chains from cars can also start wildfires. Living in a rural area, I’ve seen devastating wildfires started by cigarettes thrown out of windows and cars pulled off the side of the road when their engines broke down or caught fire.
  • If you live in an area prone to fire, defend your home before a wildfire starts. Your local Forest Service office or wildfire prevention organization can provide information on landscaping strategies. A few include pruning trees so that lower branches are no less than six feet from the ground, spacing conifers 30 feet between crowns, and removing dead vegetation that is within at least 10 feet of your house.
  • Clean debris such as fall leaves and pine needles from your garden and from decks, gutters and patio areas.
  • Avoid stacking (or move) firewood within about 30 feet of your home. Keep your lawn mowed, and your ornamental bushes and plants cleaned up, trimmed and healthy. If they take too much water, consider switching to xeriscaping.

There are plenty more strategies to use, and this guide from Firewise.org has some great ideas for landscaping and construction. Firewise also maintains a list of native plants by state that are less prone to fire or wiser in dry landscapes.

White Fire burn scar near Ruidoso, NM

Four years ago this week, the White Fire burned more than 10,000 acres and five homes around Ruidoso Downs. Here’s the burn scar from our window, along the upper left.

It’s tough to thin trees for many homeowners, especially those who own mountain homes in the cool pines to get away from hotter climates, or people who have chosen to retire near national parks and forests. But we can’t control lightning strikes and wind from Mother Nature, or negligent behavior of others.

New Mexico Recipe: Easy Red Chile

Red chile can make just about anything better. And one of my favorite quick lunches is a fried egg with red chile and melted cheese with a side of lettuce. So simple, but so New Mexican. My red chile recipe also is simple and vegetarian. Depending on where you live, the hardest part might be finding the dried chile pods. But check out the Resources page for more information.

dried-red-chile-pods

Dried red chile pods. I love the deep red color.

I use mild red chile mostly because I am a wimp. But to me, there is just as much flavor in a mild chile as in a hot one. It’s a matter of choice, as is the choice to use spices such as oregano in the recipe. I just want chile flavor. First, rinse your red chile pods and twist off the stem. As you pull it out, you can also run your fingers around inside to loosen seeds. The more you can rinse out, the less you’ll have to deal with later. Place the chiles in water and boil – I use about eight or nine pods per batch.

boiling-red-chile-pods

Red chile pods in boiling water. Be ready for your throat to tickle as the capsaicin fills the air!

Once they have boiled for a few minutes, take them off the heat. The time isn’t critical. Some people don’t even bother with the boiling step, but it makes me feel better from a food safety aspect and softens the dried chiles a bit for blending. Don’t drain the water off; simply carry the pot over to your blender (I start right away, but do this step once you’re comfortable working with the heated water and peppers). Remove the chile peppers with a spoon or scoop and place in the blender, along with a heaping teaspoon or so of fresh minced garlic.

making-red-chile

I place the hot red chiles right in the blender with a spoon of minced garlic and start adding water.

Add a few scoops of the retained boiled water to the blender and blend on a high speed. Stop and check the consistency. It’s personal preference, but I like my chile thick enough to rest on food and spread slightly, if that helps you picture the texture. Adding water slowly keeps you from making it look and run like tomato soup! Continue to add a little water at a time and blend until husks and seeds are liquefied as much as possible and consistency is rich. Next, pour out remaining water from the pot and pour blended chile into the pot. Cook on low to medium heat, reducing heat to simmer once it begins to boil (which is quickly and at a low temperature), usually for about five minutes. Let cool slightly.

red-chile-sauce-in-pot

I love the color of red chile sauce. Simmer it for a few minutes on the stove.

If you don’t want any bits of seed or pulp in your chile, you can run it through a fine strainer before or after cooking the batch. I have done this and it results in a smoother chile, but you lose quite a bit in volume. Pour the chile in a little at a time, and work it through with a spoon. Refrigerate your chile or use it soon after cooking. One batch should make about enough to freeze in an ice cube tray overnight. Usually, I let the tray sit just for a few minutes to soften slightly (not enough to thaw) and pop the cubes out of the tray, placing them in a gallon freezer bag. I thaw single or multiple cubes as needed in the microwave (covering the bowl with wax paper or a paper towel) or throw them right into the crock pot for some recipes.

freezing-red-chile

Cooked red chile poured into an ice cube tray, ready to freeze into individual portions.

frozen red chile sauce

The cubes are just the right size for a small helping and they thaw easily in the microwave or crock pot.

Be sure to wash your hands frequently while handling red chile, and still be careful rubbing your eyes. Word to the wise: If you find your chile too hot, avoid downing a glass of water with the meal. I won’t go all scientific on the properties of capsaicin, but you can fact-check me online or just do your own test if you’re adventurous. One reason you usually get a yummy flour tortilla or sopaipilla on the side is that bread (and milk) help ease the burn. Fats and oils mix best with capsaicin. That’s too bad, really. But I fry my eggs in olive oil, so there’s that…  

Easy New Mexico Red Chile

  • Servings: about 8
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Grow New Mexico chile in your garden this year, or at least buy dried pods and make red chile sauce!

Delicious New Mexico red chile sauce.

 

Ingredients: 8-9 dried red chile pods a few quarts of water 1 heaping tsp. of minced garlic Rinse chiles, removing stem and as many seeds as possible. Place chiles and a few quarts of water in a saucepan and boil for about five minutes. Remove from heat, retaining chiles and water. Place cooked chiles in a blender, along with garlic and up to 1/2 cup of water from pot. Blend until mixed well. Check consistency. Continue to add water from the pot in small amounts until blended well and desired consistency. Discard remaining boiled water and return pureed chile to pot. Cook on low to medium heat about five minutes. Serve immediately or cool slightly for straining of pulp, refrigerating or freezing.

How To Read Plant Label Codes for Watering Needs

Plant tags, labels and catalogs are much more attractive if they use icons instead of text instructions. Much like infographics, it’s a newer direction in communication. I see the good side of it, especially for people who have low literacy or shop with small children and don’t have time to turn the tag around for more information. I could say the drawback is that the more we put in symbols, the less we need writers, but that’s not a rant for this blog post.

As far as I know, water symbols are not standardized. If I’m wrong, I would love to be corrected. I think a standard nomenclature and symbol system for plant watering would be a great service to gardeners.

plant-catalogs-labels

Catalogs, seed packets and plant labels use a variety of methods to give us clues about a plant’s water needs.

Most water requirements are represented by a water droplet symbol that’s empty, partially filled or completely filled. My summary of similar legends, like the one used by the Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Water Authority, provides the following clues to irrigation:

Empty drop: A plant that requires only rainwater or no supplemental watering once established. So be sure to give a new or transplanted tree or bush extra water until it appears healthy. This can be up to a year for trees and some bushes. After that, there’s no need to irrigate the low-water plant at all. Half-filled drop: This is a medium-water plant. It will always need some supplemental water, depending on what Mother Nature delivers. Most medium-water plants need supplemental water once or twice a month during the hottest days of summer.

seed-packet-water-drop

This seed packet shows the moderate water needs of a sunflower.

Full drop: I am not familiar with these plants. Seriously, they usually aren’t going to make it in places that deliver little rainfall, and if they do, it’s not water-wise gardening. But they often can survive in the right climates and conditions, maybe in a welled spot or container, or where there’s run-off from a streambed. Of course, if you live in a tropical area, that’s just not fair. There are additional variations on these labels, like partially filled drops. I’ve also seen use of watering pails as symbols. Most add text alongside the icons, but if in doubt, ask for help from the nursery staff or a local master gardener.

portulaca-bloom

And because I have to include a pretty flower picture, here’s a portulaca bloom. I love these low-water heat lovers.

No matter what the label shows, circumstances can affect water needs, so don’t take your water icon at face value! Aside from plant establishment, wind and unexpected heat waves can dry plants out. Summer monsoons can nearly drown our drought-resistant plants! And welling and mulching around plants helps them retain water, maybe helping you push a half-filled drop to a quarter-filled one…

Growing Short-Season Vegetables

I want a greenhouse. But want and have are too far apart right now. And the beginning and end of our growing season are too close together. Like many gardeners, we want to produce as many edibles as we can during our growing season. And like many rural residents, we crave affordable, fresh produce.

We’re better off than some; our last freeze occurs in early to mid-May, and our first freeze in early to mid-October. But we all know how those predictions go. With cool, high-desert evenings, the ground has to warm up enough to germinate seeds. Add high winds and low humidity, and it’s pretty much trial and error from one year to the next!

Here are a few tips for growing vegetables and other edibles in short seasons from our attempts and courtesy of the Pacific Northwest Extension services:

  • Make sure your garden is prepped and ready for planting as soon as it’s warm enough to do so. I wrote about spring preparation a few weeks ago.
  • Choose the best spot for your garden or raised bed based on microclimates, such as along a south-facing wall to maximize heat, or where you have a natural wind break in your yard.
  • Speaking of raised beds – they warm more quickly than the ground soil. They also can drain better, but may dry faster. So consider all of these factors when selecting plants for raised beds and containers.
grape-tomato-in-pot

This yellow grape tomato grew in a container against a south wall on our patio last year. They were delicious!

  • Start your seeds early enough to have nice, sturdy transplants ready. Naturally, that only works for those edibles that transplant well, such as tomatoes. If they become too big for the starter pot, transplant the entire block into a larger pot of sterile potting mix until ready to go in the ground. And be sure to harden them off for a few weeks before planting.
  • Cool-season vegetables are easier to sow in colder climates. Examples are beets, Brussels sprouts, carrots and several greens. I’ve already planted spinach, arugula and several loose-leaf lettuces in containers and in our garden.
  • Warm-season crops might need a boost, and they surely need a good start. Make sure to plant beans, melons, tomatoes, squash and cucumber after the soil temperature reaches 50 degrees. Covering them with a light, white landscape cloth can help protect them from cool night temperature and gives seedlings a fighting chance against flying and hopping insects.
  • Choose early bloomers. Some varieties mature earlier or have a shorter time to harvest. Tim really wants honeydew, which should be sowed directly in the ground after the 50-degree soil mark. We found a hybrid that says it can be harvested in 70 days, so we’re going to give it a try. If it doesn’t work, we’re only out the cost of a seed packet, the time and most importantly, the water. Look for terms such as “cold climates,” “short season,” “early to mature” or “northern gardens.”
short-season-bell-pepper

The North Star Bell Pepper is an early-maturing pepper variety, a must for gardeners in cooler climates. Image courtesy of HomeFarmer (www.HomeFarmer.com)

  • Help your plants stay warm (or shaded) with an appropriate cover. Aside from row covers, you can use tires or hot caps to protect and warm young plants. Our neighbor is in the stucco business, and he has given us dozens of five-gallon buckets. My husband cuts out the bottom and they work great at protecting young plants from sun and wind.
protect-vegetable-seedlings

Recycled buckets from our neighbor protected young seedlings in last year’s garden.

  • Of course, here in the dry Southwest, we create troughs or wells for nearly every crop to ensure consistent, deep watering and good growth.

Finally, it’s great to get advice from local “experts.” Most are just trying to be helpful. But don’t let lore and legend trump your can-do attitude and willingness to try these tips and your own brilliant ideas!

New Mexico Chile

If there is one fact people know about New Mexico, it’s that we grow the best chile (Capsicum annuum). You might not know that paprika and cayenne come from chile products. Paprika is made from low-heat red chile, and cayenne from a more pungent, higher heat pepper.

Leaving green chile on the plant until it is red and nearly dry makes the red chile pods that are used for chile ristras, and especially to make delicious red chile sauce. People who live in New Mexico love to eat chile, and the only real debate is whether red or green chiles are better. The best way to solve any dispute and please the taste buds is to order both (a choice called “Christmas” in our local restaurants). Take my poll below if you have a strong opinion!

red chile ristras

New Mexico red chile, strung in decorative ristras. Image from the National Park Service.

According to New Mexico chile growers, the industry is in trouble because of low-cost foreign competition. But chile crops require warm weather, arid conditions and warm soil. Southern New Mexico in particular boasts the perfect chile-growing conditions. And since weather can affect not only harvest but flavor and heat of the fruit, why would anyone buy from less than the best?

If you want to grow a few plants in your own garden, the chile plants thrive best when temperatures are at or above 60 degrees. Even a light frost can kill a chile pepper plant. Direct-seeding is preferred, but you need a long, warm growing season to start chile from seeds. Otherwise, you can transplant chile plants that are about six to eight inches high and space them about 10 inches apart. Make sure they’re getting full sun and are in well-drained soil. They need consistent watering, but adjust based on rainfall. They won’t like wet feet.

green chile from community garden

Green chile harvested from neighborhood community garden, along with other great vegetables.

Chiles are ready for harvest around August, and New Mexico towns fills with the smell of roasted green chile. Both red and green chiles are loaded with vitamins A and C and tons of flavor. If you’ve never tried them before, start with mild or medium heat and work your way up. I’ll post some of my favorite recipes in the next few months.

If you can’t grow chile where you live, buy authentic New Mexico chile. Here’s a list of companies that support the NM Chile Association.

Passive Solar in the Spring: I’ll Follow the Sun

Why use fossil fuels to heat your home if you can design it to take advantage of the fact that 75 to 80 percent of New Mexico days are sunny? We were fortunate enough to buy a passive solar home two years ago. It was professionally designed for the former owners, who told us they almost never used their furnace. Two wood-burning stoves do the trick on chilly evenings and the sun takes care of the rest. The owners warned us, however, that April would be the coolest month in the house, and September the hottest. And they were right.

passive solar NM home

Passive solar home in winter. See how many windows face south to soak up sun on a clear day?

Here’s why: A passive solar home has plenty of windows facing directly south. The windows collect warmth from the winter sun, which is lower than in the summer. With good thermal mass in the form of floor tile, bricks, concrete and other materials, the heat gets stored and then releases in the evening to help keep the house warm as temperatures drop. Other design factors, such as having few north-facing windows, keep cold air out and warm air in, as do tight seals and good insulation. Landscaping also helps; planting little but deciduous trees near the home’s foundation allows winter sun through, but provides summer shade.

 

trombe wall storing solar energy

A trombe wall soaks up and stores the heat from south-facing windows. Note how much more heat can enter when the sun is low. This illustration is from the U.S. Department of Energy.

We’ve got several trombe walls made of adobe bricks and tile floors in every room but the master bedroom. I can vouch for how well the system works; I had to open windows a few times in January on sunny, warmer days.

 

trombe wall in New Mexico home

This trombe wall warms a hallway and living area. The tiles and adobe bricks store heat efficiently.

But about March to April, the sun starts shifting its path in the sky and even though the days get longer, less sun comes in our windows. If it’s also partly cloudy or cool, the house warms up less than it does in December and January. That means we’re having fires on many spring evenings to take the chill off.

In summer, we open upper, clerestory windows as soon as the air outside cools off to circulate cool air throughout the house. Then we have to shut out the hot air come morning. We might also draw a few shades, especially on the east and west side of the house. Come September, the sun starts dipping in the sky and through our windows, warming up the house when temps outside can still be high.

Throughout the year, we’ve learned to work with the home’s design and the sun to make the most of how smart the house is at using natural energy so that we save on fuel, and especially fuel costs. In fact, I have nothing but an energy-efficient wall heater and a trombe wall in my office. I use a small space heater on cold winter mornings as needed. If it gets too warm in here, I can work outside under the shade of the apricot tree!

 

passive solar home in December

December sun striking opposite wall.

If you’re considering building a new home or a remodel, I strongly recommend passive solar as a way to warm and brighten your home and to save on annual energy costs. Learn more here.

High-desert Gardening: Harsh and Heavenly

There is desert – arid, warm, often windy, and maybe sandy. And then there is high desert, which is arid, warm during the day (in summer, anyway), often windy, and very cool at night. We sit on the border of high desert and intermountain. Because we’re a small community off the radar, I doubt there are accurate records of our true temperatures and rain averages; we have our own backyard weather station to track temperature and wind speed because none of the models really match what goes on here!

When I tell people back East that I live in New Mexico, they may make a few assumptions. I speak to mostly bright people who know that New Mexico is indeed one of these United States. But occasionally, I get an “international” reaction, especially when making online purchases; see my Fun Stuff page for more on that. Most automatically assume that I’m enduring 100-plus temperatures most of the year. And having grown up in Phoenix, I get what they mean. If I were in the low desert of much of central and southern Arizona or New Mexico, it would be plenty hot.

Generally, high desert is defined as any area that’s above about 3,500 feet in altitude and has fewer than 10 inches of rainfall a year. But to grow any decent crop, you need 20 inches of precipitation. Much of New Mexico falls into the high desert category, as do many areas of the Southwest and West. Being at the base of the Sacramento Mountains, we get a little more rainfall (purportedly closer to 21 inches annually) thanks to summer monsoons. But our nights are considerably cooler than Sunset’s definition of high desert. We easily dip close to 10 degrees a few times in the winter, and it snows here.

 

new mexico snow

February snow that capped out at 10 inches in a few days (at least on our picnic table).

So if you are a plant in the high desert/intermountain west of the United States, you have to be one tough customer. In winter, temperatures can easily range more than 40 degrees in a day, and we often have a few weeks of warm spells, much to the chagrin of local ski areas. Depending on the timing of these warm spells, fruit trees and perennials can bud out early, and then get zapped by frost. The sun shines most of the year, but when you combine it with our winds, plants that lack moisture in the soil dry more quickly. Oh, and did I mention the low rainfall?

Places like Santa Fe (at 6,995 feet elevation), and many portions of Colorado at 7,000-plus in altitude can average close to 10 to 14 inches of rain a year. Leadville is considered “America’s highest city” at 10,161 feet, and only receives 15.6 inches of rain annually.

 

northern New Mexico landscape

Country road near Mora, New Mexico, which is northeast of Santa Fe. It was pretty, but dry, in early fall a few years back.

If you want to garden in the high desert, it takes plenty of xeriscaping strategies (the term was coined in Denver!). Top on the list is use of native plants, purchased from your local nursery or a company that specializes in high-desert plants. If the plant is native to your area, it’s already toughed it out. Why bring in a new guy? Microclimates can help you try to force a zone up or down, and water conservation and water reclamation can help you grab as much natural rainfall as you can get to make it through the dry spells. Mostly, you need patience. If Mother Nature throws a hard frost at you after May 15, just shake your head and hope you have better luck next year.

 

purple penstemon

One of many types and colors of penstemon native to New Mexico.

Check out my Resources page for more information, including a link to a favorite catalog source.

Spring Garden Preparation

I am itching. Well, it’s spring-time in New Mexico, so allergies have made my eyes itch. But in the figurative sense, I am itching to get my vegetable garden started. There just isn’t much we can do with the short season here, but we can prep our garden.

Our fall “to-do list” included weeding and cleaning up our garden. Did we get to it? Nope. So about a month ago, we headed outside on a warm weekend with our garden hoes and set to work. We dug up and hauled off all of the grass, weeds and debris, partially leveled the garden and mixed in about 10 bags of organic topsoil/compost. Then, we covered it all with a layer of black landscape fabric hoping to “cook” the compost and kill any remaining weeds or seed. Then we bolted the fabric down any way we could to keep the wind from blowing it away.

 

garden-preparation

After weeding, we added compost and covered the dirt. We anchored the fabric with dirt and rocks.

 

Next up? Discussing this year’s plan. Most important is crop rotation. We want more space to move around and more space for a few of the plants. We also want to eliminate waste. So we cut back on the number of crops we’ll grow, move a few others to patio containers, and add one raised bed (in a watering trough). Crop rotation is critical for plant health and yield. We ordered seeds for the vegetables we most enjoy to reduce waste and looked for the shortest time to harvest on those that have the most trouble in our cooler climate.

vegetables-from-garden

A pick from last year’s garden. We’ll skip the broccoli and peppers this year but plant more beans, which freeze well.

The seeds are in, so the next step will be planting seedlings. We’ve got our starter pods and two heating mats. We’ll start the seeds in a few weeks, hoping they are just right for setting out after our last frost date (around May 10 to 15). Meanwhile, I’m watching for a nice, warm day so I can prepare a few containers for lettuce, arugula and spinach seeds. I’m willing to try them as soon as possible because nothing beats walking out my back door at lunch time and cutting fresh leaves for a salad!

Low-water Herbs for Your Garden or Kitchen

Planning your spring garden or patio plants? You might have limited space, and certainly should consider limiting water use, so I’ve got a few tips for choosing low-water herbs for your garden, kitchen window or patio.

The good news is that like many xeric plants we grow in New Mexico gardens, many herbs have their roots in the Mediterranean. They prefer well-draining soil and low water.

Rosemary (Rosemarinus officinalis) is the first herb that comes to mind, and is one of my favorites, both as an herb and as an ornamental. You can grow a small rosemary in a pot, keeping it trimmed (by cutting the tips and using the herb in recipes, of course) or grow a mounding or spreading form of the plant in your low-water garden. As an ornamental, rosemary has attractive foliage and blooms with light blue or pink flowers. It’s a tough herb that survives cold to about 15 degrees Fahrenheit. Just watch for overwatering and snow damage. If you get a heavy snow, try to knock the powder off your rosemary plant. Here’s a link to the Herb Society of America’s fact sheet on rosemary.

rosemary-in-container

Established rosemary in pot that wintered over. I took a few cuttings all winter.

Thyme (Thymus) is another low-water favorite. Thymus vulgaris is the common shrubby herb, but several ornamental forms provide interest in the garden, and other flavors provide culinary variety. For example, lemon thyme is a favorite for marinades or sauces. I love to walk around our rock garden and rub my fingers on the leaves of our thyme shrub just to get a whiff of the scent, which is sort of a combination of earthy and salty. We use the dried leaves in several recipes and also enjoy the tiny, delicate lilac-colored flowers in summer. Thyme only needs water in the hottest zones and times of year.

thyme--herb-low-water

Thyme is evergreen even in Zone 6. Some of it dies back, and new growth appears on new stems. This is new growth in early March.

 

Lavender (Lavendula) is a favorite Mediterranean herb, and we are experimenting now with several varieties. Our biggest mistake was to place the mail-ordered plants in the ground a bit early. The soil was not warm enough for the sun lovers. Lavender must have well-drained soil to prevent the roots from sitting in water. In New Mexico, French of Spanish lavender works much better than English lavender varieties. Be careful not to cut into the woody stems when trimming. Check with nurseries or catalogs for the best variety in your area and zone and for the purpose you want. I’ve used lavender in recipes, and have dried stalks of it in vases throughout my home just for scent and attractiveness. We’ll keep trying to improve our lavender-growing skills, and studying ideas for uses. Check out our Pinterest board for more on lavender.

lavender-in-container

A new lavender plant in a container.

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) needs full sun and most varieties require no watering. Although not as attractive as the other plants I’ve mentioned, fennel is a versatile herb and easy to grow. We haven’t planted any, but it’s popped up around our garden, presumably from seeds of past plants. The fern-like leaves do have some appeal, and birds love the seeds once they turn brown. With a flavor similar to anise, fennel is a stock herb for many breads and pickling mixes. Learn more from the Herb Society of America.

Favorite Xeric Plant: Russian Sage

The woody Russian sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia) “Blue Spire” is a perfect xeric plant, especially for the gardener who wants a easy but showy low-water ornamental. This is one of my favorites! First of all, even though the Russian sage has a pleasant, sage-like scent, deer leave the plant alone. Its spikes of lavender-like flowers bloom all summer with little to no water once your plant has been established. Here’s all you need to do:

Plant Russian sage in a spot where it can grow to three to five feet tall and wide, and give it well-draining soil and full sun. It looks great near yellows like Spanish broom or black-eyed Susans, or a red, such as wine cups or cherry sage. It’s also a great plant to pair with grasses and cacti in rock gardens for a pop of color.

russian-sages-in-rock-garden

Note the pop of color from two Russian sages in the center of this photo. The one in the background was propagated from the large one.

Leave the stalks through winter, which still have an attractive shrub shape. In spring, just as you see some leaves begin to form on the lower branches, cut all of the branches back nearly to the ground. You’ll be rewarded with new, showy stalks. Bees love this plant, as do butterflies, hummingbirds, and many bird species as it seeds out.

As the Russian sage matures, you can trim it for shape and may have to cut out a few dead or crossing branches. But it looks best when full and round.

 

russian-sage-in-landscape

Close-up of mature Russian sage stalks and flowers. This one drew attention of bees, birds and passers by.

The Russian sage can put out runners (rhizomes), so keep an eye on them. I had a Russian sage at my Albuquerque home that bloomed every year for 11 years, and was there when we moved in. So it’s a long-lived perennial in the right spot, and should thrive in all zones, as long as it doesn’t get too much water!