Tag Archives: Southwest

Xeric Gardening Strategy: Saving Arid-Adopted Native Seeds

Across the nation and world, efforts are underway to save native seeds. For a number of reasons, seed banks or vaults have cropped up around the globe, some located underground, to store a variety of crop seeds. Some banks store seeds in the event of an apocalyptic event, even a natural one, that wipes out vegetation. Other reasons are simply to preserve the biodiversity of crops so they can continue to adapt to changing climate and conditions and to maintain the integrity of ancient, heirloom varieties during an age of hybridization and genetic modification.

There are more than 1,000 seed banks around the world, some private and some public. The U.S. government operates one in Fort Collins, Colo. In this and most seed storage facilities, the seeds are kept in cold storage, where they can survive for decades.

seeds in storage bank

Seeds in cold storage room at Native Seeds/SEARCH in Tucson.

In various seed banks are hundreds of thousands of plant species, some of which already face endangered status. Plants’ adaptation to various climates and conditions is important. For example, native plants I mention in my posts that have adapted to low water or drought probably wouldn’t survive in a tropical rainforest. On the other hand, only plants adapted to xeric conditions thrive during drought.

A few years ago, I had the privilege of visiting the Native Seeds/SEARCH seed conservation site in Tucson, Ariz. The program was started in 1983 as a way to help improve food security for the Tohono O’odham Nation, and has grown into an outstanding program that is helping conserve the biodiversity of arid native Southwestern crops.

ancient Native American corn

Ancient Native American corn grown in demonstration area at Native Seeds/SEARCH.

I got to see inside a preservation area, hear about the program and see evidence of some of the rare or endangered plants that Native Seeds has helped preserve. This past week, Native Seeds announced an initiative that allows supporters to “Adopt a Crop,” which helps pay to get seeds planted back in the ground. The program operates a conservation farm in Patagonia, Ariz., near the Arizona/Mexico border and sells many of the native seeds from their Tucson site and online. Many seed banks also provide education programs on how gardeners and farmers can harvest and preserve their own seeds.

native seeds

Buying and planting native, heirloom seeds supports preservation efforts.